Thursday, December 14, 2017

The changing world (30) Sept-Oct 1974

1st - David had an eye infection treated by the Egyptian doctor, Salah, at Gwoza hospital. The hospital established by our mission was take-over by the government.  4th evening at Cubitts road camp and saw The Taming of the Shrew despite the mosquito bites as we sat outdoors ninth dark. 5th - one of the students was married and we celebrated with lots of meat and rice. 8th preached in Hausa at Pulka. Evening English service in Gwoza. 11th took TEE seminar in Gwoza. 13th ditto at Pulka but only Akila (Aquila) the missionary evangelist present.
   14th a much more encouraging TEE seminar at Limankara. 15th climbed to hills to visit Guduf Sama christians. 17th drove to Molai, 110 miles, to stay a week. Missionary committee on 18th. I was diagnosed as having a viral infection. More news of persecution and bloodshed in Chad. 19th Bible School committee and led the Molai prayer meeting. 20th Maiguguri for District Church Council. 21st by coach to Jos in nine hours. Sunday church at Vom. 23rd Extension Bible School (EBS=TEE) Committee said I was tone appointed as supervisor at Panyam on the plateau. (It never happened.) The Bible School Committee said I would be teaching EBS in ten church districts. 25th eleven hors on the coach Jos to Maiduguri then had to borrow the bookshop van to Molai. 26th moved to Maiduguri and lunched with Nightingales. 27th five hours back to Limakara with supper at Gulas in Gwoza en route. Michael Phillips of SUM UK was with us. 28th Michael left and midwife Jean Bush came on a dispensary visit of several days. She was principal of midwifery school at Vom. EBS well attended. 29th preached at Limankara and had a Bible Study with three local teachers.
   Oct 1 - Independence Day and we bought food for Vwang our fellow Bible Scoolteacher to cook for staff and students. Oct 9 found EBS class at Gwoza more encouraging.  102F on our verandah and the boys have heat rash. Oct 11 news of narrow Labour general election win.
   Oct 12 took a boy with snake bite to Gwoza hospital. It as from haemolytic venom untreated except with native remedies. He was obviously terminal.  13th took students to Bama (50 miles) for Hausaservoce then I preached in English at Gwoz, 14th- a stink in our bedroom found to be from a dead lizard. Moved our bed onto verandah. Now 105 F. Jonathan has impetigo.
   Oct 24 - high wind from the north which probably indicates the rains are over. 25th very bad road to bank on Cameroon order. Going through a village a child ran in fronton the Landrover. Fortunately I was crawling along scold brake. In the town which straddled the border was asked it Would I like to greet our missionary over the border. She was Swiss and unusually had noEnglish.my schoolboy French was no good. She spoke Fulfulde (Fulani), I spoke Hausa and we had an African translate between the two languages so two Europeans could communicate.
   Oct 27 saddened to hear of the death of Peter great elder in IPC Ealing from testicular cancer. Students killed a monitor lizard two and a half feet long.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

The changing world (29) Aug 1974

Maiduguri hot and sweaty. Visited Smiths at Molai, Margaret Shapcott and Barringers, medic, there. This was the original SUM work in the far north, the leprosarium. In Maiduguri preached to a congregation of around 1000 in he English service. August 5 Smiths accompanied us to Limankara. Visited Bama and Mbuliya with lunch a Gwoza (Gulas). Big welcome at Limakara where schoolchildren helped us unload. Met Pastor Zakka who is in charge in Gwoza. The house is large with a sleeping verandah where between us and the world was mosquito netting and zana (grass) matting for decency. On successive nights hyenas were to come and take our neighbours dogs and we knew nothing. The hyenas would also dig up bodies buried at Gwoza hospital. There were jackals too. Leopards and lions were extinct. The large herd of elephants came near. We saw the signs in broken bush and spoor but never saw the herd. The most beautiful sight there was the full moon arising from behind the hills that marked the Cameroon border. Less than two hours one could climb into cameroon. The hills were terraced by the locals who rotated crops annually, millet and beans. All animals were housed in the huts for the growing season. Locals were naked and pagan except where our Nigerian missionaries like Daniel Wuyep of Langtang had planted a church. When one preached, even down at Limankara, one was used to the women topless. Accustomed as one was to the milk bar side of the church (all feeding on demand0 a topless part of the church was new to us. Te story is told of the Brethren missionary inched who supplied calabashes for female topless worshippers to cover their heads. This part is credible, the next perhaps apocryphal. When they ran out of calabashes the women removed their body cloths for head covering. I do recall climbing the Gwoza hills with Kathleen Guls. Two stark naked women were showering under a waterfall and they greeted us with embarrassment. It was the custom there that women had to cover themselves to come down from the hills to the town market. Leaving town the women took off their body cloths, folded them and carried them as headlands. Also banned in the market was beer. The beer market was outside the town. I had signed the pledge and tasted neither local beer not the palm wine. Away from our church people I did not feel obliged by a rule that went beyond the Bible. With no CRC friends I smoked and drank. With non-vision people too. I recall also being given a very sherry laden trifle. John Lang's comment was he had pledged not to drink alcohol but had said nothing about eating it.I was raised in a teetotal Methodist family though Dad would later have the odd drink. As a teenager in sixth form I was introduced to alcohol. Beer had no attraction. I like rule and blackcurrant and once came home late, drunk and vomited. After that I was temperate. At university there was sherry with the tutor and little more than the odd cider.At ANCC my future father inlay introduced me to his home made wine but I refused his beer. I never developed a taste for beer until about 1980 and whisky later. From 1984 in England I home brewed beer and wine. The former from kits, the latter fruit and kit, later only kits for IPC communion wine. Alcohol like fire is a merry servant, a gift from God, but a bad master if it enslaves you with drunkenness.
   Aug 7, in this big old house Katy lost a contact lens. We payed, searched and found it. PTL!8th Brian and Sharon Evans visited with elief grain supplies. Accountant Brian helped me with the station accounts They stayed overnight then we took the to Gwoza, 10 mils, to see Gulas and church leaders. Evangelist Ayuba (Job) a Plateau church missionary her on the plain at Isge visited.The plains used tube Muslim or depopulated as pagans fled to the hills for safety from slaving Kanuri Muslim cavalry. The horses could not climb the hills.
   Aug 12 Bible school term started. Students must be church members and have Christian marriages. Two students were admitted despite no proper marriage. Basically I disagreed with the church on marriage as they did not recognise marriage outside of the church as binding marriage. IMO thesis no better than the RC sacramental view. All marriage is marriage whether church, Islamic or by m=native law and custom IMO.
   I started teaching Islamics., Katy arithmetic. She fund the women were having problems. The reason was that had little Hausa only local languages. David was not well. Diarrhoea and no appetite.
   Aug 13 cooling rain. Church elders insisted the two students with no church marriage must leave the Bible school. Sunday 18th climbed the hills to Ngoshe where preached.All teaching and preaching was in Hausa. Aug 20 Keith and Betty Black (Aussies) visited and told of persecution with killings in Chad. They stayed overnight. Temperature up to 100F in shade. That means the kerosene fridge struggled together water below blood heat and hot wind blew through the Landrover windows.
   Church morning prayers are summoned with the bell at 6 am before dawn. People come and then may go back to bed. Sometimes I slept in not waking.
   Aug 29 a tough of malaria so felt rotten. A reformed Baptist from High Barnett, Ray Tyrell stayed. I took him round and up the hills to Ngoshe  too.
  31st called on Cubitts road construction camp beyond Gwoza. Their air conditioning is a luxury. We ourselves have no electricity and paraffin Tilley lamp heats up the evening. On the verandah it attracts insects.
 

World fertility rates


For a country to sustain its population the rate must be 2.1 or more. Less than 2.1 and immigration is the means by which population will grow.


First column 1960, second 2015




( 1 ) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, ( 2 ) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, ( 3 ) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, ( 4 ) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vita


1960197019801990200020102.53.03.54.04.55.0WORLD
World 


All Countries andEconomi



Country
1960
2015
Afghanistan
7.5
4.8
Albania
6.5
1.7
Algeria
7.5
2.8
American Samoa

Andorra
Angola
7.5
5.8
Antigua and Barbuda
4.4
2.1
Argentina
3.1
2.3
Armenia
4.8
1.6
Aruba
4.8
1.8
Australia
3.5
1.8
Austria
2.7
1.5
Azerbaijan
5.9
2.0
Bahamas, The
4.5
1.8
Bahrain
7.1
2.1
Bangladesh
6.7
2.1
Barbados
4.3
1.8
Belarus
2.7
1.7
Belgium
2.5
1.7
Belize
6.5
2.5
Benin
6.3
5.0
Bermuda
1.6
Bhutan
6.7
2.1
Bolivia
6.7
2.9
Bosnia and Herzegovina
3.8
1.3
Botswana
6.6
2.8
Brazil
6.1
1.7
British Virgin Islands

Brunei Darussalam
6.8
1.9
Bulgaria
2.3
1.5
Burkina Faso
6.3
5.4
Burundi
7.0
5.8
Cabo Verde
6.9
2.4
Cambodia
7.0
2.6
Cameroon
5.6
4.8
Canada
3.8
1.6
Cayman Islands

Central African Republic
5.8
4.9
Chad
6.3
6.0
Channel Islands
2.4
1.5
Chile
5.1
1.8
China
5.7
1.6
Colombia
6.8
1.9
Comoros
6.8
4.4
Congo, Dem. Rep.
6.0
6.2
Congo, Rep.
5.9
4.7
Costa Rica
6.5
1.8
Cote d'Ivoire
7.7
5.0
Croatia
2.3
1.5
Cuba
4.2
1.7
Curacao
1.9
Cyprus
3.5
1.4
Czech Republic
2.1
1.5
Denmark
2.6
1.7
Djibouti
6.5
2.9
Dominica
Dominican Republic
7.6
2.5
Ecuador
6.7
2.5
Egypt, Arab Rep.
6.7
3.3
El Salvador
6.7
2.1
Equatorial Guinea
5.7
4.8
Eritrea
6.9
4.2
Estonia
2.0
1.5
Ethiopia
6.9
4.3
Faroe Islands
2.4
Fiji
6.5
2.5
Finland
2.7
1.7
France
2.9
2.0
French Polynesia
5.7
2.0
Gabon
4.4
3.9
Gambia, The
5.6
5.5
Georgia
2.9
2.0
Germany
2.4
1.5
Ghana
6.7
4.0
Gibraltar

Greece
2.2
1.3
Greenland
2.0
Grenada
6.7
2.1
Guam
6.1
2.4
Guatemala
6.9
3.0
Guinea
6.1
4.9
Guinea-Bissau
5.9
4.7
Guyana
6.4
2.5
Haiti
6.3
3.0
Honduras
7.5
2.5
Hong Kong SAR, China
5.0
1.2
Hungary
2.0
1.4
Iceland
4.3
1.9
India
5.9
2.4
Indonesia
5.7
2.4
Iran, Islamic Rep.
6.9
1.7
Iraq
6.3
4.4
Ireland
3.8
1.9
Isle of Man
Israel
3.9
3.1
Italy
2.4
1.4
Jamaica
5.4
2.0
Japan
2.0
1.5
Jordan
7.7
3.4
Kazakhstan
4.6
2.7
Kenya
7.9
3.9
Kiribati
6.8
3.7
Korea, Dem. People’s Rep.
4.6
1.9
Korea, Rep.
6.1
1.2
Kosovo
2.1
Kuwait
7.2
2.0
Kyrgyz Republic
5.5
3.2
Lao PDR
6.0
2.8
Latvia
1.9
1.6
Lebanon
5.7
1.7
Lesotho
5.8
3.1
Liberia
6.4
4.7
Libya
7.2
2.3
Liechtenstein
1.6
Lithuania
2.6
1.6
Luxembourg
2.3
1.5
Macao SAR, China
4.8
1.3
Macedonia, FYR
3.8
1.5
Madagascar
7.3
4.2
Malawi
6.9
4.6
Malaysia
6.5
2.1
Maldives
7.0
2.1
Mali
7.0
6.1
Malta
3.6
1.4
Marshall Islands
Mauritania
6.8
4.7
Mauritius
6.2
1.4
Mexico
6.8
2.2
Micronesia, Fed. Sts.
6.9
3.2
Moldova
3.3
1.2
Monaco

Mongolia
7.0
2.8
Montenegro
3.6
1.7
Morocco
7.0
2.5
Mozambique
7.0
5.3
Myanmar
6.1
2.2
Namibia
6.1
3.5
Nauru

Nepal
6.0
2.2
Netherlands
3.1
1.7
New Caledonia
6.3
2.2
New Zealand
4.0
2.0
Nicaragua
7.3
2.2
Niger
7.5
7.3
Nigeria
6.4
5.6
Northern Mariana Islands

Norway
2.9
1.8
Oman
7.2
2.7
Pakistan
6.6
3.5
Palau
2.2
Panama
5.9
2.5
Papua New Guinea
6.3
3.7
Paraguay
6.5
2.5
Peru
7.0
2.4
Philippines
7.1
3.0
Poland
3.0
1.3
Portugal
3.2
1.2
Puerto Rico
4.7
1.4
Qatar
7.0
1.9
Romania
2.3
1.5
Russian Federation
2.5
1.8
Rwanda
8.2
4.0
Samoa
7.7
4.0
San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe
6.2
4.5
Saudi Arabia
7.2
2.6
Senegal
7.0
4.8
Serbia
1.5
Seychelles
2.3
Sierra Leone
6.1
4.6
Singapore
5.8
1.2
Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
Slovak Republic
3.0
1.4
Slovenia
2.3
1.6
Solomon Islands
6.4
3.9
Somalia
7.3
6.4
South Africa
6.0
2.5
South Sudan
6.7
4.9
Spain
2.9
1.3
Sri Lanka
5.5
2.1
St. Kitts and Nevis
St. Lucia
7.0
1.5
St. Martin (French part)
1.8
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
7.2
2.0
Sudan
6.7
4.6
Suriname
6.6
2.4
Swaziland
6.7
3.1
Sweden
2.2
1.9
Switzerland
2.4
1.5
Syrian Arab Republic
7.5
3.0
Tajikistan
6.5
3.4
Tanzania
6.8
5.1
Thailand
6.1
1.5
Timor-Leste
6.4
5.6
Togo
6.5
4.5
Tonga
7.4
3.7
Trinidad and Tobago
5.3
1.8
Tunisia
6.9
2.2
Turkey
6.4
2.1
Turkmenistan
6.6
2.9
Turks and Caicos Islands

Tuvalu

Uganda
7.0
5.7
Ukraine
2.2
1.5
United Arab Emirates
6.9
1.8
United Kingdom
2.7
1.8
United States
3.7
1.8
Uruguay
2.9
2.0
Uzbekistan
6.3
2.5
Vanuatu
7.2
3.3
Venezuela, RB
6.6
2.3
Vietnam
6.3
2.0
Virgin Islands (U.S.)
5.6
1.7
West Bank and Gaza
4.1
Yemen, Rep.
7.5
4.1
Zambia
7.1
5.0
Zimbabwe
7.2
3.8
World
5.0
2.5
Arab World
6.9
3.4
Caribbean small states
5.6
2.1
Central Europe and the Baltics
2.5
1.4
East Asia & Pacific
5.4
1.8
East Asia & Pacific (excluding high income)
5.8
1.8
Euro area
2.6
1.6
Europe & Central Asia
2.8
1.8
Europe & Central Asia (excluding high income)
3.1
1.9
European Union
2.6
1.6
Fragile and conflict affected situations
6.6
4.5
Heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC)
6.7
4.9
Latin America & Caribbean
5.9
2.1
Latin America & Caribbean (excluding high income)
6.0
2.1
Least developed countries: UN classification
6.7
4.2
Middle East & North Africa
6.9
2.8
Middle East & North Africa (excluding high income)
6.9
2.9
North America
3.7
1.8
OECD members
3.2
1.7
Other small states
5.1
3.1
Pacific island small states
6.8
3.2
Small states
5.3
2.9
South Asia
6.0
2.5
Sub-Saharan Africa
6.6
4.9
Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding high income)
6.6
4.9
High income
3.0
1.7

Low & middle income
5.7
2.6

Low income
6.5
4.8

Lower middle income
5.9
2.8

Middle income
5.6
2.4

Upper middle income
5.3
1.8